DOMINANCE AND DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE

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You create dominance through contrast, emphasis and relative visual weight. Your goal is to create elements with noticeable differences in visual weight. Size, Shape, Color, Value, Depth, Texture, Density, Orientation, Perceived physical weight,

1) Dominance

DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE
  • Dominance is something like emphasis but relates to an object or principle.
  • Dominance can thus be introduced by having an emphatic object in a composition or by enhancing a design principle.
  • Dominance gives a composition interest, counteracting confusion and monotony.
DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE ONE
  • Dominance refers to a comparison between adjacent objects in terms of relative visual importance.
  • Dominant features are superior to all others in visual influence.
  • A view may contain more than one dominant feature: Two objects of equal visual influence are said to be co-dominant.
  • Many dominant features in a view tend to be distracting; the eye is drawn from one to another without the opportunity to focus on one major element.
  • Dominant features in nature are mountains, a single tall tree among small trees, or any feature that clearly controls the visual scene.
  • Skyscrapers and other major man-made objects are dominant if they exert a strong visual attraction over adjacent features
DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE TWO
  • A dominant direction in the arrangement of lines creates interest and consequently ‘beauty’ in the composition.
  • Change of size creates a point of dominance and interest in these compositions.
  • A change by adding a dominating shape creates interest in these compositions.
DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE THREE
  • Dominance provides a quality to the area within the composition to which the eye is drawn.

  • Dominance relates to varying degrees of emphasis in design. It determines the visual weight of a composition, establishes space and perspective, and often resolves where the eye goes first when looking at a design.
  • There are three stages of dominance, each relating to the weight of a particular object within a composition.
DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE FOUR
  • Dominant: The object given the most visual weight, the element of primary emphasis that advances to the foreground in the composition.
  • Sub-dominant: The element of secondary emphasis, the elements in the middle ground of the composition.
  • Subordinate: The object given the least visual weight, the element of tertiary emphasis that recedes to the background of the composition.
DOMINANCE IN ARCHITECTURE FIVE
  • In the example, the trees act as the dominant element, the house and hills as the secondary element, and the mountains as the tertiary element.

2) Datum

  • A datum refers to a line, plane, or volume of reference to which other elements in a composition can relate.
  • It organize a random pattern of elements through its regularity, continuity and constant presence.
DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE
  • For example, the lines of musical staff serve as a datum in providing the visual basis for reading notes and the relative pitches of their tones.
DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE ONE
  • The regularity of their spacing and their continuity organizes, clarifies and accentuates the difference between the series of notes in a musical composition.

i) A preceding section illustrated the ability of an axis to organize a series of elements along its length. In effect, the axis was serving as a datum.

ii) A datum, however, need not be a straight line. It can be planner or volumetric in form.

iii) If planner or volumetric in form, datum must have sufficient size colure and regularity to be seen as a figure that can embrace or gather together the elements being organized within fields.

DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE TWO
  • A line can through or from a common edge for the pattern, while a grid of line can form a natural, unifying field of the pattern.
  • A plane can gather the pattern of elements beneath it or serve as an encompassing background for the elements and frame them in its field.
  • A volume can collect the pattern of the elements with in its boundaries or organize them a long its perimeter.

3) Architectural example

Marin country civic center, San Rafael, California 1957, Frank Lloyd Wright

DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE THREE

Haryu-Ji Temple Group, Nara prefecture, Japan, A.D. 607-746

DATUM IN ARCHITECTURE FOUR


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